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Moving Appliances – How to Move a Refrigerator

Moving a refrigerator can be a difficult endeavor, but if you have the right equipment, time and some extra help, then it can be done using these easy steps.

Step 1: Gather Supplies

  • Large moving dolly
  • Rope or strong cord and/or moving straps
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Plain paper or moving blankets
  • Packing tape
  • Scissors
  • Marker or labels
  • Time required: 12 hours

 

Step 2: Clear Out the Contents

  • Remove all contents, including freezer items. Give away perishables and pack up items that you’re going to take with you. Remember, if you’re moving a long distance, leave refrigerated items behind. Remove and pack magnets and any items that are on top of the fridge.
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  • Unplug the refrigerator and let the freezer defrost. This will usually take at least 6-8 hours depending on the state of the freezer. It’s best to defrost it overnight, which will allow you enough time in the morning to wipe out the inside.
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  • Remove all shelves and other loose items. If you prefer, tape the fridge drawers closed (be careful that tape doesn’t leave a mark) or remove them. Wrap the shelves with moving blankets, towels or plain paper to protect them during the move. Label the shelves appropriately.
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  • Turn off the power source and wrap the cord, securing it so it doesn’t get caught while moving.
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  • Secure the doors. With a strong cord or rope, tie the doors closed by wrapping the cord around the fridge. If you have a double-door, tie the doors together tightly. Tape will work as well, but just remember that when you remove the tape, the paint surface might be disturbed.
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Step 3: Moving the Refrigerator Out

  • Use the right equipment. I recommend that you use a dolly, one that can handle heavy equipment especially if you have to negotiate stairs or are loading the fridge into a moving truck using a ramp.
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  • Position the fridge on the dolly. Slide the refrigerator away from the wall. Slide the dolly underneath. If you prefer, tie the fridge to the dolly using moving straps. Moving straps can be rented from moving companies or box supply stores; they can be easily adjusted and are a great tool for moving heavy items.
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  • Helping hands. Once the refrigerator is in position, tip it back, with one person at the front and one at the back. A third person can help direct and jump in when someone needs help.
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  • Moving it down a flight of stairs. It’s best to move the refrigerator down the steps, bottom first. Take it slow, easing the dolly down one step at a time. If the person holding the dolly handles needs help holding the weight, have an extra person help.
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  • Moving it onto the truck. Pull the refrigerator up the truck ramp, using extra help, if needed.
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Step 4: Moving the Refrigerator In

  • Position it into its new space. Before you plug it in, let the refrigerator sit for at least 2-3 hours. This allows the fluids to flow back into the compressor. This is critical to its cooling mechanism.
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  • Leave it plugged in. It’ll take a while before the fridge is ready to use. Some require 3 days before they’ll reach an optimum temperature. Check your manual for details.
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Essential Moving Advice

  • Don’t lay it on its side.
  • Always keep the refrigerator standing upright as much as possible. This ensures that oil won’t seep into the cooling tubes which can cause permanent damage. 

  • Read the manual. Check moving instructions in your refrigerator’s manual before you move. It’ll highlight important safety tips and advice and warn you of potential problems.
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  • Don’t hesitate to call a professional. While it seems simple enough, refrigerators are heavy, awkward and moving them incorrectly can cause permanent damage. If you’re unsure about moving it, call a professional. Or if you do move it on your own and find that it isn’t working effectively in the new space, have a technician look at it.
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By Diane Schmidt, About.com Guide

July 28, 2010 Posted by | Moving | , , , , | Leave a comment

Moving checklist – don’t forget to…

We’ve covered a number of packing tips – especially for those rooms or areas that are difficult or create paranoia (e.g. – “Oh no, my china!”). Moving advice would not be complete without a reminder for those small things that slip through your memory like a sieve.

  1. Forward your mail: What seems obvious to most is often on the bottom of your to-do list.  The USPS website offers an easy, online way to do this. [https://moversguide.usps.com/icoa/flow.do?_flowExecutionKey=_c88DB6BD9-24A8-3F2E-DE33-2E5B0BC05703_kACF70886-82E6-D852-5327-DA58B3C084A5]. Keep in mind, when changing your address, the forward is in place for a maximum of 365 days but for 6 months following that year  maximum, any mail sent to you is returned to sender and they’re notified of your new address, so that’s not half bad.
  2. Update any regular bills, subscriptions, deliveries or prescriptions: Remember, after a year, your permanent change of address expires.  Any regular deliveries that haven’t been updated by you personally may begin to return to your old address if not updated by you.
  3. Update your Driver’s License: Another very common oversight is your driver’s license. Remember, even if you aren’t leaving the state, it’s against the law to have your incorrect address on your license. Check with your local police department to find out how much time you have before you’ll get in trouble over this one.
  4. Insurance: This next one can be a little somber but you should always ensure that documents you’ve signed at work for things like long term disability insurance, your health insurance and your life insurance should be updated when you move. Often times, we’re with the same company for years so you’ll want to ensure that your contact information is up to date for these.
  5. Services: These days, many people have bundled packages for things like cable internet (or DSL), telephone and television. You’ll want to call your provider(s) to get these services up and running at your new home.
  6. Utilities: Some realtors, mortgage brokers or even sellers will get your water, gas, and electric services at your house up and running for you before hand. Make sure you check on this one, though! It’s kind of a given but it needs to be on this list anyway.

Can you think of any other items that should be on this checklist? There’s a comment box below and we’d love to hear your tips (as would other readers, surely!) for making a smooth move.

We’ve covered a number of packing tips – especially for those rooms or areas that are difficult or create paranoia (e.g. – “Oh no, my china!”). Moving advice would not be complete without a reminder for those small things that slip through your memory like a sieve.

  1. Forward your mail: What seems obvious to most is often on the bottom of your to-do list.  The USPS website offers an easy, online way to do this. [https://moversguide.usps.com/icoa/flow.do?_flowExecutionKey=_c88DB6BD9-24A8-3F2E-DE33-2E5B0BC05703_kACF70886-82E6-D852-5327-DA58B3C084A5]. Keep in mind, when changing your address, the forward is in place for a maximum of 365 days but for 6 months following that year  maximum, any mail sent to you is returned to sender and they’re notified of your new address, so that’s not half bad.
  2. Update any regular bills, subscriptions, deliveries or prescriptions: Remember, after a year, your permanent change of address expires.  Any regular deliveries that haven’t been updated by you personally may begin to return to your old address if not updated by you.
  3. Update your Driver’s License: Another very common oversight is your driver’s license. Remember, even if you aren’t leaving the state, it’s against the law to have your incorrect address on your license. Check with your local police department to find out how much time you have before you’ll get in trouble over this one.
  4. Insurance: This next one can be a little somber but you should always ensure that documents you’ve signed at work for things like long term disability insurance, your health insurance and your life insurance should be updated when you move. Often times, we’re with the same company for years so you’ll want to ensure that your contact information is up to date for these.
  5. Services: These days, many people have bundled packages for things like cable internet (or DSL), telephone and television. You’ll want to call your provider(s) to get these services up and running at your new home.
  6. Utilities: Some realtors, mortgage brokers or even sellers will get your water, gas, and electric services at your house up and running for you before hand. Make sure you check on this one, though! It’s kind of a given but it needs to be on this list anyway.

Can you think of any other items that should be on this checklist? There’s a comment box below and we’d love to hear your tips (as would other readers, surely!) for making a smooth move.

July 22, 2010 Posted by | Moving | , , , , | Leave a comment

PODS, The Best Move You’ll Ever Make

PODS, the best move you’ll ever make.

PODS makes cross-country moving less stressful by removing some of the hassles and headaches from moving.

As industry experts, we know how stressful it can be to load everything you own in one day, which is why we give you all the time you need for your long distance move. When we deliver the empty container, you can take as much time as you need to load your belongings. When you finally settle in to your new home and complete your cross country move, you can take all the time you need to unload everything. Why rush and do everything in one day, when you can use PODS and take your time.

We bring it.
We bring an empty storage container right to you.

You pack it.

You load it up when you want to. When you’re ready, we pick up the container.

We store it.

We store it in one of our secure Storage Centers as long as you need it.

We move it.

We move it across town or across the country.

If you are moving out of state or across the country, then you may need to move and store your belongings. PODS has 230+ Storage Centers nationwide where you can store your loaded container between moves.

See our innovative process

In addition, PODS does all the driving, so you won’t need to worry about driving a rental truck on the interstate. Nationwide moving with a rental truck can be more costly than you might think. Add up the cost of fueling a large truck, and potential late fees along with other hidden costs, and you’ll see that national moving can be quite expensive. With PODS, our pricing is straightforward.

July 13, 2010 Posted by | Moving | , , | Leave a comment

10 Tips to Make Packing Easy

Anyone who has ever moved has had that “deer in headlights” feeling when their entire household suddenly looms around them in menacing piles.

Indeed, one of the most difficult parts of packing is just getting started. This article can help you set the process for packing; the article you’re reading will give tips on packing to help keep you moving.

These tips come from Sandee Payne, moving expert and author of “Move Your House.”

1. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, stay focused (and breathe). Concentrate on the room you’re standing in and work on one room at a time. Focusing on smaller individual tasks is always easier than trying to take on the whole job, Payne said.

2. Simplify. Let go of the things you don’t want before packing, or the things that will get in the way of your move. Do you really want that half-dead house plant? Are you tripping over remnants of your magazine collection when you’re trying to pack your living room?

3. Hold on to comfort items — like the stereo you’re using to blast some motivational AC/DC.

4. If items have many small pieces (like desk items, collections and toiletries), take the time to pack them together in a clear plastic closeable bag and label the bags.

5. Doing the laundry can be therapeutic – plus you’ll be thanking yourself post-move so you’re not washing clothes the first night in your new home.

6. Pack your items like your groceries: heavier things first and lighter items on top. The empty spaces inside your large pieces of furniture – such as drawers and shelves — can be packed with smaller, odd-shaped items after they’re loaded into the van. It’s also a resourceful way to protect breakable items.

7. Keep your TV close until the last second, warns Payne. “If not for yourself; you’ll need it to keep your children occupied when everything else has been packed away.”
 
8. Never part with legal documentation. Car titles, insurance policies and marriage certificates are the most difficult items to replace but somehow always the easiest to lose. Never pack them — but do make copies of them. Also, hand-carry valuable jewelry and other items of high sentimental or monetary value.

9. Empty all of your trash cans. Payne has seen movers pack full garbage cans into the van — not a pleasant welcome gift at your new home. 

10. Keep your luggage away from the house until you need it; it has the tendency to get packed away as well.

And a bonus tip: Use newsprint only to fill dead space in boxes, don’t use it to wrap items — the ink can get everywhere. Use packing paper for wrapping items. This also makes it easier when unpacking — just throw away the newsprint items, but you know there’s something in the packing paper, so be sure to unwrap it.

By Annika Mengisen
Special to Relocation.com

July 7, 2010 Posted by | Moving | Leave a comment

Storing Valuables and Electronics

When moving, renovating or even when you need to safely stow values and electronics, PODS storage is an easy answer. Nothing can be more devastating when temperature or moisture damage destroys your belongings. Whether they’re more recent acquisitions or heirloom items, storage center features are very important.

Storage with PODS just makes sense. Some highlights of our storage facilities are:

  • Secure – Storage centers are accessible by PODS employees and customers. Only you have access to your belongings because only you have a key.
  • Climate controlled – Our air conditioned facilities provide you with peace of mind.
  • Humidity controlled – If you’re storing items that can warp due to exposure to humidity, choose one of our humidity controlled centers. (Not available in all markets)
  • Store more! – We bring your stored items to you!  Whether you need to add more boxes or valuables to your container or you need to remove anything stored,  we’ll bring your container to you, saving you time and money!

In the event that you need to remove a large number of items from your container, don’t even consider renting a moving truck. PODS can deliver your container back to your home or to a new location and you can pack and unpack your container at your leisure.

July 1, 2010 Posted by | Moving | , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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